What's the F***ing Point episode 15: Tina Pocha on the Magic of Self-Reinvention

Tina Pocha is one of those women you lose track of time talking to. The wisdom she shared about the process of self reinvention, but learning about her life story and perspective was just as interesting.

I know you’ll dig this interview, and since I’m a little brain-dead at the moment, there’s not much I want to say about it other than GO LISTEN! Links to references in the episode are below.

Also, Tina is generously offering a free discovery coaching session for any WTFP listeners during the months of September, so take advantage of that shit, y’all!

To listen to this episode, you can stream or download from the embedded player below, or find and subscribe in your fave podcast listening app. 

Thanks for listening, and if you dig, please share it with a friend and review the podcast on iTunes because it helps more people find it! xx

About Tina Pocha, PhD

Tina is a writer, teacher, and Women’s Re-invention Coach. She works with smart, talented, accomplished women to help them get clarity on why they feel stuck in their careers, in their lives. She supports her clients in reconnecting with what they really want to do and who they really want to be — to ultimately find and follow their heart’s desire. You can find her online at thenextstepcoaching.net, and her blog at tinapocha.com.

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Valerie Martin

Valerie Martin, LMSW, is a Primary Therapist at The Ranch residential treatment center, where she works with eating disorders, addiction, trauma, and co-occurring mental health issues. Valerie focuses on a holistic treatment approach of mind + body integration, using Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT), somatic and bioenergetic therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), psychodrama, 12-step, and shame resilience. She is also a Certified Sexual Addiction Therapist (CSAT) Candidate. Valerie received her Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Master of Science degree in Clinical Social Work at the University of Texas in Austin. She is an active member of the First Unitarian Universalist Church in Nashville, and emphasizes spiritual exploration in her work with clients.

why i'm happy i'm not a gardener

why i'm happy i'm not a gardener

The funny thing about the title of this post is that a couple of my closest Nashville friends are not just gardeners, but professional gardeners. (And for a woman-owned, almost entirely female-staffed gardening biz with a badass Rosie-the-Riveter-inspired logo, no less). If I were them, I'd see this headline and be all "whaaaa why is Val throwing shade?" — to which my response is, "girl, I thought you'd want all the shade you can get, it's getting pretty damn hot out there." #horriblepunintended

I digress.

As my hard-working hubby Chris is outside at this very moment pulling weeds and planting herbs, I'm in here in the air-conditioned living room on the couch, typing away in my little computer world. Do I feel guilty? Well, a tiny bit, since I will totes enjoy those herbs — but he knows gardening is NOT my thing, and that when I do it, I get really pissy after about ten minutes, so it's really no fun to be around me anyway. Left to my own devices, I'd plant and kill herbs for a month or two (spare me the lecture on how to care for herbs kthx) until resigning myself to paying for the exorbitantly overpriced grocery store variety.  

A couple of years ago, inspired by my badass aforementioned gardener friends, I said I wanted to learn how to garden. Oh boy! I couldn't wait to get some tips and lessons from them, get my hands on some gardening books, and dig in. But it never happened.

For a long while, I felt guilty about it. "What's wrong with me? Why am I not taking action on this? I keep saying I want to do it, and doing nothing." Chris would convince me, literally maybe once/season, to get out in the yard with him. (For him, it's not even so much as having the help as it is the company — sweet, and misguided, as he eventually learned re: the quality of the company.) 

I don't remember at what point I swallowed my pride and admitted it to myself, but sometime in the last year or so, I finally said it: I really don't like gardening. In fact, I kind of actually HATE gardening. 

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video blog: defusing from life-sucking thoughts

Today I'm excited to post my very first video blog, focused on the concept "defusion" from Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT). When you're really hooked by thoughts that are not helping you move in the direction of the life you want (whether the thoughts are true or not), practicing various defusion techniques can be a way to unhook and get a little distance from the thoughts so you're not totally consumed by them. Ultimately, defusion helps you to be able to exist with the thoughts (good luck just trying to banish those thoughts entirely... you'll likely make yourself even more frustrated if that's your goal!) AND still choose the actions and behaviors that lead you in the direction of a functional and fulfilling life. If positive affirmations don't always work well for you, give defusion a try. Hope you enjoy this brief intro!

For more info and tons of great ideas for practicing defusion in your everyday life, check out The Happiness Trap by Russ Harris.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T9J-_akGX6s

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Valerie Martin

Valerie Martin, LMSW, is a Primary Therapist at The Ranch residential treatment center, where she works with eating disorders, addiction, trauma, and co-occurring mental health issues. Valerie focuses on a holistic treatment approach of mind + body integration, using Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT), somatic and bioenergetic therapy, Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT), psychodrama, 12-step, and shame resilience. She is also a Certified Sexual Addiction Therapist (CSAT) Candidate. Valerie received her Bachelor of Science degree in Communications and Master of Science degree in Clinical Social Work at the University of Texas in Austin. She is an active member of the First Unitarian Universalist Church in Nashville, and emphasizes spiritual exploration in her work with clients.